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Program Faculty

Gopi Meenakshisundaram

Gopi Meenakshisundaram

Gopi Meenakshisundaram’s research work focuses mainly on topics related to Computer Graphics, including Geometry and Topology for Computer Graphics, Image-Based Rendering, Object Representation, Surface Reconstruction, Collision Detection, Virtual Reality, and Telepresence. Recent projects include “Parametrizable Object Representations across Geometry and Images,” and “Surface Reconstruction Algorithms for Surfaces with Boundaries from Noisy Point Data”. He is also working with ICS facultry member Renato Pajarola on “Quality Control of Image Based Rendering Systems.” He received his MS from Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India and his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His papers have been published in Computational Geometry, Theory and Applications,
International Journal of Computational Geometry and Applications and the Journal of Parallel and Distributed Computing, among others.

 

 


Gloria Mark

Gloria Mark

Gloria Mark’s primary research interest is in technologies that support distributed work. She studies technology use in real organizations, and also in the Groupware Lab that she set up at UC Irvine. Her work also includes groupware technology adoption, group-to-group collaboration across distance, requirements analysis, and attention management and collaboration. Organizations she has studied collaboration in are aerospace, microprocessor design, and government. She has authored papers for Computer Supported Cooperative Work: The Journal of Collaborative Computing, Communications of the ACM and others. She has contributed to a number of academic conferences on group wear and collaborative technologies, including CSCW, and GROUP.

 

 


Lisa Naugle

Lisa Naugle

Lisa Naugle holds a Ph.D. and MFA in dance from New York University. Lisa was a member of the Nancy Hauser Dance Company and has performed and choreographed in the United States, Canada, London, Amsterdam, Germany, Italy, Poland, and Hungary. She has worked with Hanya Holm, Alwin Nikolais, Merce Cunningham, and Eric Hawkins. Her current research and creative activity centers on computer-based applications for dance including motion capture, interactive and real-time video processing, and telematic performance (including two Internet 2 grants.) Her telematic performance works include Voyage of Aeneas:FIXED/NOT, Reverse Patterns, Songs of Sorrow, Songs of Hope, The Cassandra Project, and Janus/Ghost Stories. Her papers have been published in Dance Research Journal, Performance Art Journal, Journal for Distance Education and in numerous conference proceedings. She is active member of Congress on Research in Dance and serves on the Board of Directors for the International Dance and Technology organization. She is the recipient of the Cecil and Ida Green Honors Professor’s Award, 2000.

 

 


Antoinette LaFarge

Antoinette LaFarge

LaFarge is an artist and writer with a particular interest in fictive realities and role-playing games. She is the founder and artistic director of the Plaintext Players, a pioneering group of artists, writers, and performers engaged in creating a unique form of live, online theater since 1994. She is also founder and director of the Museum of Forgery, a virtual institute dedicated to exploring the aesthetics of forgery. In recent works such as Virtual Live (2002), The Roman Forum (2000), and The Roman Forum Project (in preparation for March 2003), Antoinette has been working with the intersection between net-based improvisation in multi-user worlds and realspace performance. She has also collaborated with Annie Loui and James Fallon to create “Reading Frankenstein,” an experimental performance that explores themes of Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” reframed as a contemporary myth of artificial intelligence, and integrating historical and contermpoary scientific images of the brain.

 

 


Falko Kuester

Falko Kuester

Dr. Kuester is the co-founder of the Visualization and Interactive Systems Group. His research interests include virtual reality, large-scale data visualization, computer graphics, simulation based design and geometric modeling. His research efforts are aimed at creating intuitive, high-resolution virtual environments, providing engineers and scientists with a means to explore and analyze massive and complex three-dimensional data. He is currently developing a virtual wind tunnel to test the efficiency of new real-time out-of-core visualization strategies that render massive data sets directly from computer hard disks while requiring only small amounts of computer memory. In a past project, he created a virtual automobile prototype for human factors, ergonomic studies and design verification, which replaced the physical automobile prototype during the early development stages. The potential applications for Dr. Kuester’s work include design, manufacturing and testing, medicine and bio-informatics, among others.

 

 


Christopher Dobrian

Christopher Dobrian

Christopher Dobrian is Associate Professor in the Music Department of the Claire Trevor School of the Arts at the University of California, Irvine. He is a composer of instrumental and electronic music, teaches courses in -composition, theory, and computer music, and directs the Realtime Experimental Audio Laboratory (REALab), the Gassmann Electronic Music Studio and the Gassmann Electronic Music Series.

 

 


John Crawford

John Crawford

John Crawford is a digital media artist, interactive performance director, software developer and user interface designer. He is a leader in the emerging field of digital videodance, exploring techniques for combining digital video and computer-generated animation with motion sensing to produce projected imagery that reflects and responds to movement. He originated the Active Space concept in 1993 to describe his interactive theatrical performance systems that combine motion capture technology, real-time video and audio sensing equipment with custom software to generate visuals and sound. His digital media work has been performed and exhibited throughout North America and in Europe, and he has taught performance and technology in California, New York and in the Pacific Northwest. He founded the digital media software company electricFX, and currently teaches motion capture animation, videodance, web/media design and digital arts history and practice at University of California, Irvine. He also teaches and consults on user experience and interface design, and his software credits include projects for Microsoft, Adobe and many other companies. 

 

 


Jennifer Terry

Jennifer Terry

Jennifer Terry is an associate professor of Women’s Studies at the University of California at Irvine. Her focus is on gender and sexuality studies, the cultural dynamics of science, medicine, and technology, and American Studies. She is the author of An American Obsession: Science, Medicine, and Homosexuality in Modern Society (University of Chicago Press, 1999) and co-editor of Deviant Bodies: Critical Perspectives on Difference in Science and Popular Culture (Indiana University Press, 1995) and Processed Lives: Gender and Technology in Everyday Life (Routledge, 1997). She has also written articles on reproductive politics, the history of sexual science in the United States, and contemporary scientific approaches to the sex lives of animals. In addition she has worked as an associate producer on several documentary films, including The Cucumber Incident (screened on the Sundance Channel in 2003).  Prof. Terry’s previous affiliations were as assistant and associate professor of Comparative Studies at Ohio State University and visiting associate professor of Women’s Studies at Berkeley.  She held post-doctoral positions at the Center for the Study of Women (UCLA, 1999-2000); the Humanities Institute (SUNY Stony Brook, 1992); and the Pembroke Center for Research on Women (Brown University, 1991-1992).  She holds a Ph.D.in the History of Consciousness from UC Santa Cruz (1992), an MLIS in Archival and Information Studies from UC Berkeley (1984), and a BA in Politics from UC Santa Cruz (1980). Professor Terry is now working on a project titled Sentiments in Transit: Conditions and Consequences of Remote Intimacies.  The book explores changing modalities and qualities of sentiment in light of emerging technologies that mediate the expression of love, hate, rage, fear, indifference, commitment, desire, and repulsion.

 

 


Kavita Philip

Kavita Philip

Kavita Philip is Associate Professor of Women’s Studies at U C Irvine. She received her M.S. in Physics from the University of Iowa in 1989, and her Ph.D. in Science and Technology Studies from Cornell University in 1996, Her recent writings have been in the fields of colonial environmental history, human rights and globalization, feminist science studies, and critical technology studies. Her monograph, Civilizing Natures, appeared in two editions in 2003 and 2004 (Orient Longman-Asia and Europe edition; Rutgers University Press- U.S. edition). She is currently co-authoring a book with Terry Harpold: Going Native: Cyberculture and Postcolonialism. Her other collaborative editorial work includes Constructing Human Rights in the Age of Globalization, co-edited with political scientists Andrew Nathan, Mahmood Monshipouri, and Neil Englehart; and Multiple Contentions, (Radical History Review Issue 89), co-edited with historian Andor Skotnes.

 

 


Bonnie Nardi

Bonnie Nardi

I recently joined the faculty of the School of Information and Computer Science at the University of California, Irvine. I am an anthropologist specializing in the study of technology.  My theoretical orientation is activity theory, a philosophical framework developed by the Russian psychologists Vygotsky, Luria, Leontiev, and their students. My interests are user interface design, collaborative work, computer-mediated communication, e-democracy, and theoretical approaches to technology design and evaluation.

 

 


Jim Bobrow

Jim Bobrow

James E. Bobrow is a Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of California, Irvine, and is currently a Visiting Professor at the Field and Space Robotics laboratory at MIT. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles, Mechanics and Structures Department in 1983. His Ph.D. Thesis was on the optimal control of robotic manipulators. After graduate school, Prof. Bobrow was a senior programmer analyst at McDonnell Douglas Automation Company, where he developed CAM software for the Unigraphics system. In 1984, Dr. Bobrow joined the University of California, Irvine as an assistant professor. While at UCI, his research areas have progressed from the design of pneumatic actuators for robotic systems, to robotics for rehabilitation, to machine learning systems. Dr. Bobrow has also been a Visiting Professor in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University, and he has created robots and automation devices for several start-up companies, including Robomedica, Inc. and Cobra Technologies. He serves on the Board of Directors of Robomedica, Inc., and he has served on the program committees or organizing committees of the leading conferences in control systems and robotics.

 

 


Peter Krapp

Peter Krapp

Professor Krapp’s current research in the “digital humanities” continues his work on media theory and cultural memory. He is completing a manuscript on what he calls the distraction economy: tracing attention and its deficits in discussing digital culture. In addition, he is co-editing two other volumes - one on film title sequences (the first book-length academic study of this important form between cinema, motion graphics, and digital art), and one on critical media studies and the concept of “defense” (an international conference at UC Irvine).

 

Websites

http://www.krapp.org/

 

 


Joerg Meyer

Joerg Meyer

Center of GRAVITY (Graphics, Visualization and Interactive Technology), Calit2

Dr. Meyer holds a Ph.D. and M.S. degree in Computer Science and Electrical Engineering. He joined UC Irvine in 2002. His research interests include large-scale scientific visualization, biomedical imaging, digital image processing, interactive rendering and virtual reality. He developed hierarchical space subdivision techniques for multi-resolution rendering, and wavelet-based compression schemes for interactive data storage, transmission and rendering of large volumetric data sets. His expertise in developing interactive rendering algorithms reaches into several application domains, ranging from medical visualization to earthquake simulations and educational games. He has published his work in over 112 public venues, conferences and journals, including IEEE, ACM and IASTED. His interactive video installation “Fantastic Voyage” (in collaboration with Dr. T. Wischgoll, Wright State University) was displayed at the Discovery Science Center, Santa Ana, CA.

 

 


Tau-Mu Yi

Tau-Mu Yi

Tau-Mu Yi is a systems biologist interested in the quantitative description of G-protein signaling, and the analysis of the robustness of biological networks.

 

 


Crista Lopes

Crista Lopes

The research I do is always related, one way or another, to languages and communication systems. The ultimate goal of my research is to deepen the knowledge about communication, in particular in systems that involve humans and machines. With this goal in mind, I work in software design, programming languages, device-to-device communications and application-specific networking. I have also done some work in security and applications of audio signal processing. I am most interested in computing systems that are still to come, such as those envisioned as Ubiquitous Computing. To find out about my current projects and students, follow the links on the left or visit the mondego pages.

 

 


Mark Poster

Mark Poster

Mark Poster is a member of the History Department at UCI, the Department of Film and Media Studies, and the Critical Theory Emphasis. He also has courtesy appointments in the Department of Information and Computer Science and the Department of Comparative Literature.
Some of his recent publications are: What’s the Matter with the Internet? (University of Minnesota Press, 2001), The Second Media Age (Blackwell, 1995), The Mode of Information (Chicago Press, 1990) and Cultural History and Postmodernity (Columbia University Press, 1997). A collection of pieces old and new with a critical introduction by Stanley Aronowitz is published as The Information Subject (G & B Arts International, 2001). He is continuing his study of the social and cultural theory of electronically mediated information with a forthcoming work entitled Information Please: Culture and Politics in a Digital Age (Duke University Press, 2006).

 

 


David Reinkensmeyer

David Reinkensmeyer

Prof. Reinkensmeyer’s research interests are in neuromuscular control, motor learning, robotics, and rehabilitation. A major goal is to develop physically interacting, mechatronic devices ("rehabilitators") to help the nervous system recover arm and leg movement ability after neurologic injuries such as stroke and spinal cord injury.  Another goal is to understand the adaptive control processes that enable motor learning, in order to provide a rational basis for designing rehabilitators.  Prof. Reinkensmeyer’s laboratory has developed a variety of robotic devices for manipulating and measuring movement in humans and rodents.  These devices are being used to investigate the role of mechanical assistance in retraining arm movement following stroke, the feasibility of providing movement training remotely using the Internet, and the role of sensory information in locomotor plasticity after spinal cord injury.  Prof. Reinkensmeyer’s laboratory also uses computational models to better understand neural control principles.

 

 


Tom Boellstorff

Tom Boellstorff

Dr. Boellstorff is currently engaged in two research projects. The first focuses on male transvestites (waria), HIV/AIDS, regional autonomy, and national society in Indonesia. Despite knowledge of prevention and new antiretroviral therapies, the global caseload skyrockets and access to treatment remains segregated by wealth. It is clear that the greatest enemy in combating HIV/AIDS is not knowledge or resources in the abstract, but the conceptual frameworks with which we understand risk, health, and human being.

His second current research project concerns cybersociality in virtual worlds, mainly the construction of subjectivities and social relationalities in cyberspace. How does the category of the material become transformed in virtual worlds? How do domains like “economic” and “domestic” become reworked in virtual worlds? What are the implications of forms of embodiment where an individual can change genders, ethnicities, or even species at will? What does it mean when a “person” can point to another “person” and say “that woman is also me?”

 

 


Bill Tomlinson

Bill Tomlinson

Bill Tomlinson is a researcher and animator of autonomous computational characters. His current work explores the connections between social relationships, emotion, and human ethical systems. Previous interactive projects have been shown at SIGGRAPH, Ars Electronica, the ZKM Future Cinema exhibition and other venues, and have been reviewed by CNN, the Wall Street Journal, Sculpture Magazine, Scientific American Frontiers, the LA Times, Wired.com and the BBC. In addition his animated film, Shaft of Light, screened at the Sundance Film Festival and was distributed by the Anti-Defamation League in its Anti-Bias/Diversity Catalog. He holds an A.B. in Biology from Harvard College, an M.F.A. in Experimental Animation from CalArts, and S.M. and Ph.D. degrees from the Synthetic Characters Group at the MIT Media Lab. Bill is ACE’s Associate Director of External Relations.