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Classes taught 2004/05

Spring 2005

The Archive (ACE 270)
Peter Krapp

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ACE Studio/Laboratory: Games and Algorithmic Systems in Literature and the Arts (ACE 272)
Robert Nideffer
Explores the cultural tradition of the game and game play with particular reference to the automation of games in computational systems and the close relation between gaming, imporvisation, hypertext, and interactive art. Game programming techniques and projects.

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Interactive Arts (ACE 277)
Chris Dobrian

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Virtual Reality (ACE 277)
Falko Kuester

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ACE Thesis Research Seminar (ACE 278)
Simon Penny

The function of this class is to assist students in developing skills and resources to ensure that students are prepared to ensure completion of graduation requirements by the end of the following Spring. Deliverable include :

- a thesis proposal which is academically rigorous, including a synopsis (1000 words) , table of contents and bibliography.
- a proposal for a thesis project which his artistically and technically rigorous. 1000 words, with illustrations, plans and references, multimedia if/where appropriate
- a thesis committee with formal agreement by committee members,
- a clear workplan for timely completion of thesis project and written thesis, including development timeline with milestones.
- an exhibit of research to date in the end of year exhibition, including maintenance of the exhibit in a funtioning form for the duration of the exhibition, training of gallery attendants, participation in organisation and promotion, and documentation.

Preparation of each of these deliverables will involve research, presentation and critique.


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class site: http://eee.uci.edu/03f/02632/

Motion Capture (ACE 277)
John Crawford

Motion Capture is the process of recording live motion over time in three-dimensional space, then translating that motion into a form that can be used by 3D animation software. The motion that is recorded can be from any moving source: some examples are full human body movement, facial expressions, animal movement and the motion of inanimate objects such as props. Applications of motion capture include live performance, character animation, video games, film production, physical rehabilitation, medical research, industrial measurement and many others. A wide range of technologies are being developed for motion capture applications, including optical (camera arrays), mechanical (linked armatures), electromagnetic fields and ultrasound.

This course is a practical introduction to the basic principles of optical motion capture and how this technology can be used for creating computer animation of human figures, with a primary focus on creative applications in the arts. It provides basic coverage of key portions of the motion capture animation pipeline, including setting up the studio and preparing capture subjects, acquiring and cleaning the motion data, applying the data to 3D animated characters, and rendering the 3D animations to movie files. It also touches on embodiment and performance from the aesthetic, historical and theoretical perspectives, investigating how motion capture contributes to the overall practice of computer animation, and how animation connects with other art practices.

This is an experiential course, emphasizing hands-on experience and creative production. Students are responsible for completing a series of assigned motion capture projects, working in small teams. Effective collaboration between team members is an important part of the class.


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Winter 2005

ACE Studio/Laboratory Studies (ACE 277)
Falko Kuester

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ACE Studio/Laboratory: Interactive Installation and Performance Design Workshop (ACE 271)
Simon Penny
Designing persuasive spatialized interactive experiences: spatially and temporally distributed narratives. User-system relationships. "Freedom" in interaction: authority and control. Audience and the spect-actor. Sensors, behavior logics, and multi-modal output. Machine learning and atopedagogic systems. Training in relevant technologies.

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Digital Signal Processing (ACE 277)
Chris Dobrian

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Fall 2004

Performance Theory (ACE 277)
Bill Tomlinson

An in-depth course on the phenomenon of emotion in humans. Topics include the biological basis of emotion; methods of modeling emotion; the relationship between emotion, social relationships and stories; and the various manifestations of emotion in dramatic performances. Readings will relate emotion to a wide range of disciplines including acting, directing, design, cinematography, animation, literature, artificial intelligence, neurology, biology and psychology. A substantial final project will give students the opportunity to explore an emotion-related topic of their choice.


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Machine Art and the Aesthetics of Behavior, from Cybernetics to Artificial Life (ACE 270)
Simon Penny

The creation of computationally automated behaving artforms has a substantial history, but one which has remained obscured by the interdisciplinarity of the field (not to mention a certain distaste for the whole idea in the discipline of Art History). Knowledge of this history will be a professional asset to ACE candidates and those interested in contemporary media practices.
Class will begin with a rapid historical overview of 18th and 19th century precedents. Discussion of 20th century precedents such as Kinetic Sculpture will lead into examination of the Art and Technology movement of the late 60s and early 70s, paying attention to the influences of both Cybernetic and early Artificial Intelligence theory on the field. The influence of 60s and 70’s radical (art)forms such as performance, site-specific work, conceptual art, video and expanded cinema will also be discussed. Discussion will then move to telematics experiments of the 80s, and robotic art, VR art and interactive installation of the late 80’s and 90s. The influence of Artificial Life, Autonomous Agents, procedurality and evolutionary and genetic computing paradigms will be examined. The rapid growth of gaming, especially massively multi-user environments, and cultural practices involving mobile computing will be addressed. As the emphasis is on real time computing and interaction, especially spatialised and embodied experience, the class will not consider computer graphics, animation, web art, or hypertext in any detail.

Illustrated with rare and unique images and video.
Purchase of the class reader is required.
Grading based on tutorial, final paper and class participation


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class site: http://eee.uci.edu/03f/02632/

Motion Capture (ACE 277)
John Crawford

Motion Capture is the process of recording live motion over time in three-dimensional space, then translating that motion into a form that can be used by 3D animation software. The motion that is recorded can be from any moving source: some examples are full human body movement, facial expressions, animal movement and the motion of inanimate objects such as props. Applications of motion capture include live performance, character animation, video games, film production, physical rehabilitation, medical research, industrial measurement and many others. A wide range of technologies are being developed for motion capture applications, including optical (camera arrays), mechanical (linked armatures), electromagnetic fields and ultrasound.

This course is a practical introduction to the basic principles of optical motion capture and how this technology can be used for creating computer animation of human figures, with a primary focus on creative applications in the arts. It provides basic coverage of key portions of the motion capture animation pipeline, including setting up the studio and preparing capture subjects, acquiring and cleaning the motion data, applying the data to 3D animated characters, and rendering the 3D animations to movie files. It also touches on embodiment and performance from the aesthetic, historical and theoretical perspectives, investigating how motion capture contributes to the overall practice of computer animation, and how animation connects with other art practices.

This is an experiential course, emphasizing hands-on experience and creative production. Students are responsible for completing a series of assigned motion capture projects, working in small teams. Effective collaboration between team members is an important part of the class.


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Academic Calendar Year

2008/09

2007/08

2006/07

2005/06

2004/05

2003/04