Art and Artificial Life - a Primer

This essay is an attempt to contextualise Artificial Life Art by providing an historical overview, and by providing background in the ideas which helped to form the Artificial Life movement in the late 1980s and early 1990s. based life-forms. Unfortunately but inescapably, such debate was often muddied by Extropian rhetoric asserting that in computers and robotics, humans were building the machine successors to biological (human) life. 2009.

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Rigorous Interdisciplinary Pedagogy - Five Years at ACE

The emergence of media-arts and digital cultural practices has provided a highly charged context for the development of interdisciplinary pedagogy, combining as it does, practices and traditions from historically, culturally and theoretically wildly divergent disciplines. This paper addresses aspects of effective interdisciplinary educational process, attending to questions of pedagogy, theory and institutional pragmatics. 2008.

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Rigorous Interdisciplinary Pedagogy - Appendix

This text is the final section of the paper Rigorous Interdisciplinary Pedagogy five years of ACE in its original version and focuses on the specifics of the implementation of the ACE program at the University of California Irvine. 2008.

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Experience and Abstraction: The Arts and the Logic of Machines

This paper is concerned with the nature of traditions of Arts practice with respect to computational practices and related value systems. At root, it concerns the relationship between the specificities of embodied materiality and aspirations to universality inherent in symbolic abstraction. This tension structures the contemporary academy, where embodied arts practices interface with traditions of logical, numerical and textual abstraction in the humanities and the sciences. 2007-08.

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Bridging Two Cultures: Towards an Interdisciplinary History of the Artist-Inventor and the Machine-Artwork

The goal of this paper is to assert the historical validity of a consistent tradition of practice which exploits emerging electronic and mechanical technologies for cultural purposes. Due to its inherently interdisciplinary nature, this tradition can be fully understood neither within the terms of conventional art historical discourse nor within the terms of discourses of technological research and development. 2005-08.

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Representation, Enaction and the Ethics of Simulation

The goal of this paper is twofold, academic and activist. The academic goal is to attempt to enhance critical discussion of interactive media practice and interactive media cultural practice by introducing a consideration of the implications of embodied involvement in the process. The activist dimension arises from this, and raises a question of ethical responsibility regarding cultural objects which might function as training environments to build behaviors which will ultimately be expressed in the real world. 2004.

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Adequate Pedagogy: the Missing Piece of Digital Culture

Human culture, and western culture in particular, is in a process of radical change due to the development of digital technologies. It is characteristic of cultural practices that emerging technologies are rapidly colonised and tested. A diverse range of new digital cultural practices are currently emerging. This cultural change demands new types of educational programs in order to train new types of professionals. Such educational programs will combine existing disciplines in new ways and will also include new emerging contexts, new technique and new practices. 2003.

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Traces: Embodied Immersive Interaction with Semi-Autonomous Avatars

Traces (1998-9) is an artwork for the CAVE that uses a novel machine vision system to enable unencumbered full body interaction with a range of semi-autonomous agents without the imposition of any sort of textual, iconic or encoded-gestural interfaces and without physically restrictive wiring, pointing devices, or headgear. Furthermore, Traces does not consist of a world which is navigated; instead, the movement of the user through the space leaves volumetric and spatial-acoustic residues of user movement which slowly decay. This project was motivated by a desire to explore and critique four central issues in contemporary HCI: (a) embodied interaction with computational systems; (b) rapid and transparent learning of interfaces by untrained users (the autopedagogic interface); (c) immersive bodily interaction with software agents, (d) extension and elaboration of the general conception of interactivity itself. 2001.

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